Warning

COVID-19 UPDATES:  Latest information, visitor restrictions, home care instructions, etc.               Updated daily

Screening Hotline: (207) 447-4190

More Information

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  • 207-723-5161
  • info@mrhme.org

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Latest COVID-19 Statistics

 


The interactive charts below break down our most current data based on county, age, trends, etc.

 

Additional COVID-19 data and statistics can be found here courtesy of the Maine Centers for Disease Control.
We’re closely monitoring this situation and will provide updates as new information becomes available.

 

Source: Maine Centers for Disease Control

How to Protect Yourself & Others

First and foremost, know how COVID-19 spreads   

  • There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
  • The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.
  • The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.
    • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
    • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks.
    • These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.
    • Some recent studies have suggested that COVID-19 may be spread by people who are not showing symptoms.

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We encourage everyone to take the following precautions; for the protection of yourself as well as others.

   Wash your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • It’s especially important to wash:
    • Before eating or preparing food
    • Before touching your face
    • After using the restroom
    • After leaving a public place
    • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
    • After handling your cloth face covering
    • After changing a diaper
    • After caring for someone sick
    • After touching animals or pets
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

 

   Avoid close contact

  • Inside your home:  Avoid close contact with people who are sick.  If possible, maintain 6 feet between the person who is sick and other household members.
  • Outside your home:  Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and other people who don’t live in your household.

 

   Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others

  • You could spread COVID-19 to others even if you do not feel sick.
  • The cloth face cover is meant to protect other people in case you are infected.
  • Everyone should wear a cloth face cover in public settings and when around people who don’t live in your household, especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.
    • Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.
  • Do NOT use a facemask meant for a healthcare worker.  Currently, surgical masks and N95 respirators are critical supplies that should be reserved for healthcare workers and other first responders.
  • Continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.

 

   Cover coughs and sneezes

  • Always cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow and do not spit.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

 

   Clean and disinfect

  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them. Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.
  • Then, use a household disinfectant. Most common EPA-registered household disinfectants will work.

 

   Monitor Your Health Daily

  • Be alert for symptoms. Watch for fever, cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Take your temperature if symptoms develop.
    • Don’t take your temperature within 30 minutes of exercising or after taking medications that could lower your temperature, like acetaminophen.
  • Follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

 

 

Symptoms

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 or (coronavirus 2019) is a newly identified coronavirus caused by a virus called SARS-CoV 2.  It was first identified in China in December 2019 and has infected thousands of people around the world.

Coronaviruses are a type of virus that typically affect the respiratory tract of birds and mammals; humans included.  Doctors associate them with the common cold, bronchitis, pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and now, COVID-19.

As we know, COVID-19 is much more severe than other common coronaviruses and can lead to hospitalization or even death.

 

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

COVID-19 affects different people in different ways.  People infected with the virus have reported a wide range of symptoms; from mild to severe illness.

The symptoms of COVID-19 can be difficult to distinguish, as they present symptoms like other coronaviruses similar to the common cold.

Some or all of the following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure:

      • Fever or chills
      • Cough
      • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
      • Muscle pain or body aches
      • Headache
      • New loss of taste or smell
      • Sore throat
      • Congestion or runny nose
      • Nausea or vomiting
      • Diarrhea

This list does not include all possible symptoms.  The CDC will continue to update this list as more is learned about COVID-19.

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Anyone experiencing symptoms should call the COVID-19 hotline (207) 447-4190 to be evaluated by an MRH provider.  This designated hotline is open Monday through Friday, 8AM – 5PM, to answer your questions and coordinate testing (as needed) and treatment.

Do not present to the emergency room or doctor’s office unless experiencing severe symptoms, such as the emergency warning signs below.

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When to Seek Emergency Medical Attention

Look for emergency warming signs* for COVID-19.  If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

      • Trouble breathing
      • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
      • New confusion
      • Inability to wake or stay awake
      • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all possible symptoms.  Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility:  Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

 

Asymptomatic COVID-19 Carriers

It is possible to be infected with COVID-19 and spread it to others without experiencing symptoms yourself.

No matter what, if you’ve been exposed to someone with COVID-19, you should self-quarantine for the entire 14-day incubation period. Even if you feel fine, you’re still at risk of spreading the coronavirus to others.

Research has shown that high levels of the virus are present in respiratory secretions during the “presymptomatic” period that can last days to more than a week prior to the fever and cough characteristic of COVID-19.

This ability of the virus to be transmitted by people without symptoms is a major reason for the pandemic.

 

Sources: Centers for Disease Control,  New England Journal of Medicine

Testing

Two kinds of tests are available for COVID-19: viral tests and antibody tests.

      • A viral test tells you if you have a current infection.
      • An antibody test might tell you if you had a past infection. An antibody test might not show if you have a current infection because it can take 1–3 weeks after infection for your body to make antibodies. Having antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19 might provide protection from getting infected with the virus again. If it does, we do not know how much protection the antibodies might provide or how long this protection might last.

 

If you currently have symptoms..

Please call the COVID-19 hotline (207) 447-4190 or your primary care provider to be evaluated.  Based upon their assessment, your provider may refer you for a viral test.

Viral tests check samples from your respiratory system (such as swabs of the inside of the nose) to tell you if you are currently infected with COVID-19.

Not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19, but only a healthcare provider can determine what is best for you.

      • Most people have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care. They may not need to be tested.
      • At this time, there is no treatment specifically approved for people who have COVID-19.

Do not present to the emergency room or doctor’s office unless experiencing severe symptoms, such as the emergency warning signs such as:

        • Trouble breathing
        • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
        • New confusion
        • Inability to wake or stay awake
        • Bluish lips or face

 

Getting Tested

Viral tests, also referred to as diagnostic or PCR tests, analyze samples from your respiratory system to tell you if you are currently infected with COVID-19.

The swab will be sent away to a lab for testing, which can take anywhere from 24-48 hours.  In the meantime, you should follow precautions as if you do have the virus.

Keep in mind:  The virus can take a few days to begin replicating in the throat and nose.  Your body needs to produce enough viral load in order to be detected by the PCR testing.

 

Test results

Tests typically take between 24-48 hours to be processed at the lab.

Your provider will contact you with your test results and guidance on how to care for yourself, precautions to take with others, treatment of symptoms, etc.

      • If you test positive for COVID-19, know what protective steps to take If You Are Sick or Caring for Someone.
      • If you test negative for COVID-19, you probably were not infected at the time your sample was collected.  However, that does not mean you will not get sick.  It is possible that you were very early in your infection when your sample was collected and that you could test positive later. Or you could be exposed later and then develop illness.

In other words, a negative test result does not mean you won’t get sick later.  This means you could still spread the virus.

 

Asymptomatic testing for travel purposes

Testing for asymptomatic persons with no known exposure is available through the MRH Walk-In Care clinic.  The clinic, located at 87 Main Street in East Millinocket, is open Monday through Friday, 7am-7pm.   Appointments are required, so please call ahead (207) 447-4700 to set up a time for testing.

COVID-19 tests are sent to the state laboratory for processing.  Results are typically available within 48-72 hours.  Patients will be contacted with their results during normal business hours.

The cost of this test is $75 and payment is expected at the time of service.  The person requesting the test can submit for reimbursement through their insurance company.

For more information: MRH COVID-19 Testing for Travelers

Why would an asymptomatic person wish to be tested? 

The State will allow adults who obtain and receive a negative COVID-19 test from a specimen taken no longer than 72 hours prior to arrival to forgo the 14-day quarantine upon arrival in Maine.

This test indicates that, even when coming from areas with a higher prevalence of the disease than Maine’s, such visitors are unlikely to have COVID-19 and to spread it to Maine residents and other visitors.

The State of Maine Centers for Disease Control encourages visitors to get tested and receive their test results in their home state before traveling to Maine.  Individuals who wait to be tested in Maine must quarantine while awaiting the results.

 

Testing for past infections

If you think you may have had COVID-19, an antibody test may assist in that determination.  It is designed to to identify antibodies otherwise known as proteins that help fight off infection.

It can take the body 1-3 weeks after the infection to make antibodies.  Antibodies are typically associated with immunity, but experts still do not know if having antibodies to the COVID-19 virus can protect someone from getting infected with the virus again, or how long that protection might last.  At this time, the most practical use for antibody testing is in regard to COVID-19 plasma donations.

Antibody tests should not be used to diagnose someone as being currently sick with COVID-19.

 

Additional information:

Keep Maine Healthy: Travel Information

Guidance for COVID-19 testing coverage for uninsured individuals

Application for COVID-19 testing coverage

State of Maine partners with IDEXX To more than triple testing capacity

Local connection: Puritan Medical of Guilford doubles COVID-19 Swab Production

 

Source: Centers for Disease Control

Treatment

There is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for COVID-19 at this time.

Those with COVID-19 should seek out supportive care to help relieve symptoms.  Based upon the individual’s symptoms, this may include:

  • Pain relievers and fever reducing medications (avoid ibuprofen)
  • Allergy medication to reduce congestion
  • Cough drops to soothe sore throat
  • Plenty of rest
  • Plenty of fluids

If you have asthma or another respiratory illness, be sure to have extra inhalers or medication on hand.

 

 

Source: Centers for Disease Control

MRH COVID-19 Response

MRH is currently in “incident command” mode; meaning that all decisions and preparation are being coordinated daily by senior administration with input from department managers, medical staff, and outside agencies.

Information is rapidly changing, and we are working diligently to make the best decisions with the information provided to us by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the State of Maine.

We have an extensive plan we’re working through and implementing as necessary.

Please take the time to learn more about some of the actions we’ve taken to protect our community and prepare for COVID-19.

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June 11th, 2020

After being closed due to COVID-19, we’re excited to share that LIFEstyle Fitness is re-opening Monday, June 15th, under strict guidelines put forth by the state.  We’re taking every precaution we feel necessary to ensure your safety while working out.

There will be noticeable changes, and we urge you to review them prior to your arrival in our letter to LIFEstyle Fitness clients.

If you have questions, please call us during regular business hours at (207) 723-6454.

Our staff thanks you for your patience and cooperation as we all adjust to these new procedures.

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April 27, 2020

We’ve been hearing some buzz that some people in our community believe we are in the clear in terms of the coronavirus in the Katahdin Region.  Unfortunately, this is simply not true.

While Maine is in kind of a steady state in terms of new COVID cases, the Katahdin Region is not.  Our overall numbers are relatively low in the tri-town area, but they continue to rise by a couple of patients each day.

 There are now between 10 and 15 confirmed positive COVID cases in the Katahdin Region.

This should be a wake-up call to the community.  COVID-19 is here, and this is not the time to relax the pandemic guidelines.  Rather, we need to ramp them up.

We must all be strongly committed to social distancing, mask use, hand washing, etc.  If you have any signs of illness, please isolate yourself.  These simple precautions will help protect us all.

Our goal is to keep everyone in our community healthy.  We’ll do our part— but we need you to do yours.

Stay well.  Be vigilant.  We’ll get through this together!

_______________________________________

April 9, 2020

The COVID-19 hotline is now open SEVEN days a week.

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April 3, 2020

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April 2, 2020

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April 1, 2020

The first positive case of COVID-19 in the tri-town region has been confirmed.

_______________________________________

March 30, 2020

Due to the COVID-19 precautions, we have temporarily changed the way we are seeing patients to optimize your safety.  Anyone presenting to our facilities will be greeted at the door, you will be asked a series of questions and have your temperature checked prior to entering the offices.

Patients needing to be seen for a sick or acute visit will be scheduled at our Primary Care practice located at the lower Main Entrance of Millinocket Regional Hospital.

Patients needing to be scheduled for a routine visit, follow up appointment, physical or well-child exam, will be scheduled at our Family Medicine location at the top of Poplar Street.

We are going to try our best to keep you with your designated provider, however, we ask for your flexibility during this time.

If you would prefer to reschedule your visit, we will support you.  However, we can also offer you a telephone visit.

_______________________________________

March 27, 2020

Maine reported the first death from coronavirus (COVID-19) today.

_______________________________________

March 19, 2020

All entry to Millinocket Regional Hospital must be through the main entrance on the upper level. An alternate entry point is available Monday through Friday, 7:30am to 4:00pm at the lower level Somerset Street entrance.

Employees and patients will be screened prior to entry, including obtaining temperature and a check for respiratory symptoms.

_______________________________________

March 13, 2020

For the protection of our patients, our staff, our community, and you from potential COVID-19 Virus, MRH has implemented a NO VISITOR policy effective immediately.

If accompanying a patient that is being seen in our Emergency Department or one of our medical offices, we ask that you wait in your vehicle for your friend or family member.

_______________________________________

March 10, 2020

MRH is currently in “incident command” mode; meaning that all decisions and preparation are being coordinated daily by senior administration with input from department managers, medical staff, and outside agencies.

Information is rapidly changing, and we are working diligently to make the best decisions with the information provided to us by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the State of Maine.

We have an extensive plan we’re working through and implementing as necessary.

Please take the time to learn more about some of the actions we’ve taken to protect our community and prepare for COVID-19.

MRH COVID-19 Response

MRH is currently in “incident command” mode; meaning that all decisions and preparation are being coordinated daily by senior administration with input from department managers, medical staff, and outside agencies.

Information is rapidly changing, and we are working diligently to make the best decisions with the information provided to us by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the State of Maine.

We have an extensive plan we’re working through and implementing as necessary.

Please take the time to learn more about some of the actions we’ve taken to protect our community and prepare for COVID-19.

 

_______________________________________

April 27, 2020

We’ve been hearing some buzz that some people in our community believe we are in the clear in terms of the coronavirus in the Katahdin Region.  Unfortunately, this is simply not true.

While Maine is in kind of a steady state in terms of new COVID cases, the Katahdin Region is not.  Our overall numbers are relatively low in the tri-town area, but they continue to rise by a couple of patients each day.

 There are now between 10 and 15 confirmed positive COVID cases in the Katahdin Region.

This should be a wake-up call to the community.  COVID-19 is here, and this is not the time to relax the pandemic guidelines.  Rather, we need to ramp them up.

We must all be strongly committed to social distancing, mask use, hand washing, etc.  If you have any signs of illness, please isolate yourself.  These simple precautions will help protect us all.

Our goal is to keep everyone in our community healthy.  We’ll do our part— but we need you to do yours.

Stay well.  Be vigilant.  We’ll get through this together!

_______________________________________

April 9, 2020

The COVID-19 hotline is now open SEVEN days a week.

_______________________________________

April 3, 2020

_______________________________________

April 2, 2020

_______________________________________

April 1, 2020

The first positive case of COVID-19 in the tri-town region has been confirmed.

_______________________________________

March 30, 2020

Due to the COVID-19 precautions, we have temporarily changed the way we are seeing patients to optimize your safety.  Anyone presenting to our facilities will be greeted at the door, you will be asked a series of questions and have your temperature checked prior to entering the offices.

Patients needing to be seen for a sick or acute visit will be scheduled at our Primary Care practice located at the lower Main Entrance of Millinocket Regional Hospital.

Patients needing to be scheduled for a routine visit, follow up appointment, physical or well-child exam, will be scheduled at our Family Medicine location at the top of Poplar Street.

We are going to try our best to keep you with your designated provider, however, we ask for your flexibility during this time.

If you would prefer to reschedule your visit, we will support you.  However, we can also offer you a telephone visit.

_______________________________________

March 27, 2020

Maine reported the first death from coronavirus (COVID-19) today.

_______________________________________

March 19, 2020

All entry to Millinocket Regional Hospital must be through the main entrance on the upper level. An alternate entry point is available Monday through Friday, 7:30am to 4:00pm at the lower level Somerset Street entrance.

Employees and patients will be screened prior to entry, including obtaining temperature and a check for respiratory symptoms.

_______________________________________

March 13, 2020

For the protection of our patients, our staff, our community, and you from potential COVID-19 Virus, MRH has implemented a NO VISITOR policy effective immediately.

If accompanying a patient that is being seen in our Emergency Department or one of our medical offices, we ask that you wait in your vehicle for your friend or family member.

Frequently Asked Questions

What should I do if I feel ill or suspect I have been exposed to COVID-19?

Anyone experiencing symptoms should call the COVID-19 hotline (207) 447-4190 to be evaluated by an MRH provider.  This designated hotline is open Monday through Friday, 8AM – 5PM, to answer questions as well as coordinate testing and treatment.

Do not present to the emergency room or doctor’s office unless experiencing severe symptoms such as: trouble breathing, persistent pain or pressure in the chest, new confusion, inability to wake or stay awake or bluish lips or face

 

How long does it take for symptoms to present?

It can take anywhere for 2-14 days for symptoms to appear after exposure.

 

Am I contagious even if I don’t have symptoms?

It is possible to be infected with COVID-19 and spread it to others without experiencing symptoms yourself.

No matter what, if you’ve been exposed to someone with COVID-19, you should self-quarantine for the entire 14-day incubation period. Even if you feel fine, you’re still at risk of spreading the coronavirus to others.

Research has shown that high levels of the virus are present in respiratory secretions during the “presymptomatic” period that can last days to more than a week prior to the fever and cough characteristic of COVID-19.

This ability of the virus to be transmitted by people without symptoms is a major reason for the pandemic.

 

What should I do if someone in my home, or someone I have close contact with, has COVID-19?

Household members, intimate partners, and caregivers in a non-healthcare setting who have close contact* with a person with symptomatic, laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 or a person under investigation should monitor their health and they should call their healthcare provider right away if they develop symptoms suggestive of COVID-19 (e.g., fever, cough, shortness of breath).

*Close contact is defined as “being within approximately 6 feet of a COVID-19 person for a prolonged time.”  Close contact can occur while caring for, living with, visiting, or sharing a health care waiting area or room with a COVID-19 case or close contact is also having direct contact with infectious secretions of a COVID-19 case (e.g., being coughed on).

 

What is the difference between quarantine and isolation?

According to the US Department of Health & Human Services, isolation and quarantine are public health practices used to protect the public by preventing exposure to people who have or may have a contagious disease.

      • Isolation separates sick people with a contagious disease from people who are not sick.
      • Quarantine separates and restricts the movement of people who were exposed to a contagious disease to see if they become sick. These people may have been exposed to a disease and do not know it, or they may have the disease but do not show symptoms.

 

When can I discontinue isolation?

Patients with COVID-19 (whether confirmed or suspected) should remain under home isolation precautions until the risk of secondary transmission to others is thought to be low. The minimum time period is 10 days, and 3 days must then have passed where there is NO fever without the use of fever lowering medications, and other symptoms are improving such as cough and shortness of breath.

 

If you have tested positive but have been symptom free, the isolation from others should be for a minimum of 10 days since you received a positive test.

 

Downloadable Resources:

Cloth face mask FAQ + instructions

Home Care Instructions for COVID-19

 

Sources:  Centers for Disease Control, US Department of Health & Human Services

Visitors

As a precautionary measure to protect our patients, staff and community from COVID-19,
Millinocket Regional Hospital has implemented a

NO VISITOR POLICY

beginning March 13, 2020, that will remain in effect until further notice.

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Visitors are defined as anyone who is not actively receiving healthcare services.

This includes but is not limited to:

  • Family or friends of patients
  • Family or friends of employees
  • Patients who are on premise to pay a bill
  • Freight delivery drivers

If you are accompanying a patient that is being seen in our Emergency Department or one of our medical offices, please wait in your vehicle for your friend or family member.

_______________________________________

Those approved for entry, including staff, must be screened for COVID-19 symptoms prior to entry.  Any person (including staff) failing the screen will be directed to receive a medical evaluation and possible COVID-19 testing.

Thank you for your understanding and cooperation during this time.  While this may cause some inconvenience, please remember these measures are in place for your safety and the safety of our patients.

Bill Pay

Due to the hospital’s strict NO VISITOR POLICY, entrance to MRH is restricted to employees and patients seeking healthcare.  In other words, we are not accepting in-person payments unless you’re already in the building to obtain medical services.

Other options for bill pay include online or via good, old-fashioned mail.

Pay by credit card

www.mrhme.org/billpay

Pay by check

Mail check to address provided on the statement or to:

Millinocket Regional Hospital
200 Somerset Street
Millinocket, ME 04462

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Questions about your bill?  We’re here to help!

Contact us by phone

Trubridge        (877) 818-1379

MRH               (207) 723-3369
……………….(207) 723-7247

Contact us by email

jwaite@mrhme.org

 

We apologize for the inconvenience and appreciate your cooperation!